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Orlando Brief – Orlando Chamber of Commerce circa 1939

Around 1939, the Orlando Chamber of Commerce created a document with photos and information about Orlando and the surrounding area for presentation to the committee appointed by the United States War Department to investigate sites submitted for the establishment of a branch Air Base of the United States Army. The document includes typed information, original photographs, statistics and a map of the area.

The original pages are carbon copies and some are difficult to read. The document is transcribed here and photos inserted as in the original, however spacing and font styles are different. Text in italics is not part of the original document but added for clarity or as links. Peruse the original or read the transcribed version below. 

Title Page.

O R L A N D O

B R I E F

Prepared for presentation to the Committee appointed by the United States War Department to investigate sites submitted for the establishment of a branch Air Base of the United States Army.

Page 1.

Orlando

ORLANDO, known as “The City Beautiful” is said to be the world’s most beautiful resort city, and it is Florida’s largest inland center.

Orlando’s permanent population is conservatively estimated at 37,500, which was augmented during the past winter season by more than 31,000 visitors.

Large industries choose Orlando because of its natural resources. There are more than fifty types of industry here, in which are represented more than three hundred manufacturing firms large and small, among them several national distributors, such as citrus canning plants. The packing and shipping of citrus fruits occupy much of the year in Orlando. Orlando is located in the heart of the citrus and truck farming section of Florida, and these crops in this immediate area are valued at 7 to 10 millions of dollars annually. Orlando’s population of today has grown from 22,000 in 1925. The population of Orange County is estimated at about 65,000.

Being the largest inland city in the State, Orlando is considered the metropolis of Central Florida. Our modern and aggressive shops and department stores serve a population of more than 275,000, within a radium of 60 miles. This retail trade area extends 100 miles in many directions and covers a population of some 345,000. Statistics show that Orlando shops and markets now enjoy the patronage of one-eight the entire population of the State.

LOCATION: Orlando is situated in the geographic center of the Florida peninsula, and is in the center of the good roads of the State. Six main highways lead from the city to the main arteries of traffic. Any city in the State can be reached in a day’s motor trip, Orlando being in the section which is only 100 miles from coast to coast – 40 miles from the Atlantic, 60 miles from the Gulf.

AREA: Orlando is a city of 7,650 acres, contained in a 11.91 square mile area. The longest distance across the city from north to south is four and one-half miles; from east to west, three and one-half miles, Thirty-three lakes in part or in entirety are within the city limits with an area of 618 acres and a frontage of 21.25 miles, with surrounding boulevards beautified with overhanging trees, foliage and beautiful flowers. Parks and playgrounds cover 325 acres inside the city limits.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS: Among Orlando’s outstanding public buildings are: the municipally owned Utility plant, housed in a building costing $2,500,000, to which additions in equipment and to the building are being made at the present time at an estimated additional value of $600,000. They also maintain an executive building in the uptown section, completed at a cost of $35,000,00. The building of the Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Co. cost $1,500,000.00. The Old Court House is used for Federal relief offices, and the New Court House was erected at a cost of $1,370,000.00. The Atlantic Coast Line depot represents a cost of $250,000.00 and is considered one of the most beautiful buildings of its kind in the entire southeastern section of the United States. Considered one of the outstanding

ORLANDO – #2

Chamber of Commerce buildings anywhere, the Greater Orlando Chamber of Commerce is housed in a building, erected for that purpose, costing $140,000.00. Among the newer buildings in the city is that of Kress & Co., costing $250,000 and a branch of Swift & Co., costing $100,000.00. The Albertson Public Library is housed in a building costing $250,000. The Municipal Auditorium in Exposition Park seats 3,600 persons. Three first-class picture theatres bring the latest releases.

HOUSING FACILITIES: There are ample and excellent hotel facilities for any size convention or group, as well as caring for our winter guests and commercial travelers. New and modern apartment buildings further care for seasonal and permanent residents. In addition to these very excellent accommodations, which can readily care for any program, Orlando is prepared to house additional residents in the city and rentals are in line with those of any other city in the State.

HOSPITALS: Two large hospitals, using the newest methods and equipment, and other semi-private sanatoriums offer the best in supervised medical care. There is also located just a few miles from our city the State Tuberculosis Sanatorium.

EDUCATION: In Orlando there are 12 public schools, each housed in large comfortable buildings, one of which has been built during the past two years. These include one senior high, two junior high and eight elementary schools, all fully accredited; and a Vocational School of Trades and Industries. There are accommodations for 7,000 pupils, providing ample provision for schooling the children of both residents and winter visitors. Hundreds of students graduate annually from the Orlando Senior High School and enter institutions of higher learning without the necessity of entrance examinations. In addition there are two business schools and several private and semi-private schools, including one parochial school, further providing for the education of Orlando’s youth. Located just four miles from Orlando at Winter Park, is Rollins College, the oldest institute of its kind in the State.

CHURCHES: The more than sixty churches in Orlando include all denominations, and churches, like schools, are so strategically located over the city that one is convenient to both in almost any residential section, with the larger churches near the heart of the business district.

BUILDING PERMITS: In 1936, building permits in Orlando totaled $1,384,927.00; in 1937, $1,569,425.00 and in 1938, $1,724,675.00. For 1939, to June 1, our building permits total more than one million dollars for five months, which tends to show a substantial increase.

CLIMATE: Orlando has the most equable climate in the world, with an average temperature of 69.5 degrees. Our winter temperature averages 60.9 degrees and our summers, 77.5, making a difference of but some 16 degrees between our winter and summer averages. From the charts shows below, can be seen our monthly temperatures over a period of three years, as well as the annual precipitation, which shows the heavier rainfalls during the summer months, when most needed.

ORLANDO – #3

TEMPERATURE CHART
Temperature chart from page 3 of Orlando Brief.

 

POSTAL RECEIPTS: For the year 1920, Postal Receipts in Orlando amounted to $65,139.01; in 1930, $186, 167.84; in 1937, $263,429.36 and in 1938, $278,928.85.

POSTAL FACILITIES: Orlando has a modern Post Office Building, employing 110 persons to expedite service to the ultimate in both first-class and parcel post departments. Air Mail service includes eight daily mails, two North and two South bound, and two to the East and two to the West coasts. A total of 20 daily mails is included in Orlando’s service, with 8 mails by railroad service, 4 Star Route and 8 Air Mail. A twenty-four hour per day service is maintained in the Orlando Post Office. Work will be begun during this year on a new Post Office and Federal Building in Orlando to cost $645,000.00.

ORLANDO – #4

TRANSPORTATION: The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad serves Orlando and the Seaboard Air Line Railroad terminates in the city. The Florida Motor Lines, serving the State of Florida, maintain a terminal in Orlando, connecting in Jacksonville with the Greyhound Lines. There are local offices for the Clyde Mallory Lines, the Merchants Miners Line, The Lanier Steamship and the Orlando Steamship agencies, also a Refrigerator Steamship Line. Orlando has splendid air transportation, this city being known as the “Air Capitol” of Florida. Orlando is served by both the National and Eastern Air Lines, giving mail, passenger and express service to all parts of the country. There are thirteen transfer companies in the city, a city bus service on regular scheduled trips and numerous taxicab companies.

BANKS: Orlando’s banking institutions include the Florida Bank at Orlando, the First National Bank at Orlando and the First Federal Savings & Loan Co. Bank deposits in 1920 totaled $5,114,215.98, and in 1930 were $4,161,051.35, despite three bank failures after 1929, bank deposits on December 31, 1937 were $10, 300,554.75 and on December 31, 1938, $12,136,951.18. In addition to these, there is the Florida Citrus production Credit Association, commonly known as the “citrus bank” and this title is warranted because of the record of that institution. During each year, millions of dollars in loans are made to hundreds of citrus growers over the entire citrus belt.

NEWSPAPERS: Orlando is served by two daily newspapers, The Orlando Morning Sentinel and the Orlando Evening Reporter Star. These maintain 3 Associated Press wires, 2 United Press wires and one International News Service wire, making a total of 6 special wires daily to each paper. During the first quarter of 1939, the net paid average circulation of the two Orlando daily newspapers was 20,953, the largest daily circulation in the history of any Orlando newspaper. In addition to these dailies, the Orlando Times is published semi-weekly and the Orlando Shopping News weekly.

UTILITIES: Light, power and water are furnished to the City of Orlando by its municipally owned Utilities Commission, at rates which are shown in EXHIBIT A and B, attached, both residential and commercial. In 1920 there were but 4,500 registered customers of this service; while for the year 1938, this number has increased to 19,607.

GAS: The Florida Public Service Company, with their main offices, plants and headquarters in Orlando, furnish gas to the City of Orlando, and gas, lights and power to the outlying communities. Their rates, both commercial and residential, area shown in EXHIBITS C and D, attached.

ORLANDO – #5

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH: Orlando is served by the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, the Western Union Company and the Postal Telegraph Company. The Western Union Company is served by 26 main trunk line circuits, entering the city in 5 different directions, insuring uninterrupted telegraph service at all times. Operation is done over high-speed automatic printer circuits, which is the same equipment used by all large cities. In over fifteen years there has not been a minute’s delay due to wire prostration with Western Union in Orlando. Postal Telegraph facilities are ample in every respect to give the very best of telegraph service. Besides being in position to give direct service to a great many Florida points from Orlando, Postal has direct circuits to both Jacksonville and Tampa where messages are relayed to all other points within the State. These are in addition to interstate circuits serving the entire nation. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company has a modern exchange, equipped with the most modern of dial telephone exchanges in the United States, with ample facilities to render prompt and efficient telephone service, both local and long distance. Any type private branch exchange switchboard can be furnished and installed promptly on short notice. There is no connection charge on the original installation of such equipment provided a five-year contract is executed. Due to the geographical location, Orlando is the leading toll center and distributing point for long distance calls in Central Florida. They now maintain 115 long distance lines terminating at the Orlando office with ample facilities to put in additional circuits promptly.

RADIO BROADCASTING FACILITIES: Orlando’s broadcasting station, WDBO, is one of the finest in the State, having 5000 watt power during the day and 1000 watt power at night. WDBO is a full time member of the Columbia Broadcasting System. News from United Press is broadcast at frequent intervals, a total of 8 times during the broadcast day. “Station-tested” programs have created an increase response. Participating programs three times daily on week-days. This radio station began operation in March, 1924, and has enjoyed a steady expansion in facilities and services. Complete new equipment was installed in January 1938. There is maintained a 370 foot vertical  radiator, 2 ½ miles from the center of Orlando. A transcription library is available and the station does not use phonograph records. A Price-Waterhouse survey of listeners in the Orlando area, made in 1936, asking “what radio station do you listen to regularly?” revealed that WDBO commands a regular listening audience of 93.5% – one of the highest ratings ever achieved by a CBS station. WDBO is first choice for spot broadcasting in Florida. Extension studios are maintained in DeLand, Florida, 35 miles from Orlando. Remote control is used for sporting and civic activities. Broadcasts are made three times daily of weather forecasts and temperature bulletins and a complete broadcast of information regarding extreme changes in the weather. WDBO is the only regional station in the State having land and listeners on all sides, and this station covers more than one-half the population of Florida.

ORLANDO – #6

AIRPORT: The Orlando Municipal Airport is located one-half mile east of the city limits and two miles east of the principal business section and leading hotels. It contains 200 acres of usable field, within the present fence with 330 additional acres recently acquired by not developed. This airport is considered one of the finest in the entire southeastern United States. There are three paved Macadam runways, 100 feet in width. The north-south runway extends 2500 feet, the east-west runway 3410 feet and the northeast-southwest runway 2200 feet. The entire usable area is day marked and has night lighting, with flood lighting from the hangar available. Two major airlines – Eastern Air Lines and National Airlines System operate a total of 8 schedules per day through Orlando, which is classed as an airline terminal. In 1938 more than 3500 passengers either boarded or disembarked from airliners at the Orlando port. The Orlando Airport is officially designated as one of the three Air Mail Airports in the State. Here each night over 200 pounds of airmail from all central and west coast Florida is sorted and sacked in a branch Post Office located at the Airport. Overnight service in both directions connects Orlando with the major metropolitan areas of the United States (direct service to both New York and Chicago and points en route). The Orlando Department of Aviation is authorized to approve and regular commercial flying activities. Flight instruction is permitted only by approved professional instructors, of which here are two at present. Orlando has long been known as the Nation’s favorite rendezvous for private flyers. Each year hundreds of visiting pilots are entertained here. An annual event is a lively Air Party staged during the winter months, when Orlando plays host to private and non-scheduled flyers from all parts of the country. The Orlando Municipal Airport is in its eleventh year of operation and has enjoyed an unusually large amount of commercial, military and private flying. In this entire period there has not been a fatal accident or serious injury to either pilot or passenger on this port. The Orlando port is equipped with the best in navigational aids, with the latest weather reports available.

WITH THE EXCELLENT BROADCASTING FACILITIES, AIR, RAIL, TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH CONVENIENCES, TOGETHER WITH ITS CENTRAL LOCATION, ORLANDO IS AMPLY SUPPLIED AND DESIRABLY SITUATED WITH FACILITIES FOR SENDING OUT AND RECEIVING INFORMATION WITH THE UTMOST EXPEDITION. THESE, COMBINED WITH THE TWO DAILY NEWSPAPERS AND OTHER MODERN FACILITIES AND CONVENIENCES, MAKE ORLANDO AN IDEAL LOCATION FOR THE BRANCH AIR BASE OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY.

Orlando is a cultural and recreational city. The cultural industrial, recreational, commercial, social, civic, religious, literary, musical, dramatic and sports life is so balanced, the blend presents a universal appeal. Whatever ones preference, there will be found in our city enthusiastic circles with like inclinations and every opportunity to indulge your interests.

ORLANDO – #7

RECREATION AND SPORTS: Orlando and the surrounding upland lake region is one of Florida’s favorite sport areas. Tennis, golf, horseback riding, sailing, swimming, fishing, hunting, and baseball are year round activities. The Orlando Tennis Club, which each winter brings ranking players to the city for tournaments of national interest, maintains twelve excellent clay courts, on its grounds. Two golf and country clubs in Orlando, the Dubsdread Golf and Country Club and the Country Club of Orlando, each have tennis facilities and throughout the city public courts are maintained by the Recreation Department of the City. Two eighteen hole golf courses, both highly regarded by local and visiting players, are maintained by the two country clubs. In nearby Winter Park a nine-hole course is available. At Sanlando Springs and at Mount Plymouth there are also eighteen-hole courses. Two riding stables stable privately owned horses and also have horses for rental. Riding instruction is available and at intervals competitive events are held. In March of each year a Horse Show, which attracts some of the nation’s finest show horses, is held in Orlando. Within a 50-mile radius of the city are 5,000 fresh water lakes of varying size. These are famous with anglers, for their large mouth black bass. On many of the larger lakes are fishing camps and boating facilities. Lake Apopka, internationally known for the excellence of its bass fishing, is within 12 miles of Orlando. Because of the city’s location in the center of peninsula Florida, many residents find saltwater fishing on both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic ocean enjoyable, in a short drive. Our lakes are also popular with sailors of small boats. The Orlando Yacht Club maintains facilities on Lake Conway and also conducts regattas during each year. Virtually all lakes are open for swimming. Natural springs in the area have a constant temperature winter and summer and are popular bathing spots during all seasons. At the Municipal Solarium, sun bathers may bask in the sun in sheltered courts and at the Dubsdread Country Club a pool is maintained for use of members. Deer, quail, dove, duck and wild turkey are hunted in the Orlando vicinity during the open season, beginning in late November. Sportsmen from all parts of the eastern United States enjoy the shooting. At the Orlando Sun Club is maintained a skeet shooting range. The city has long been a favorite training spot for major league baseball clubs. It is now the winter home of the Washington Nationals of the American League and is also headquarters for the Joe Stripp School of Baseball, which opens each January and trains more than 150 ambitious young players. Night baseball is played by the Orlando Club of the Florida State League which schedules games from April to September. A Municipal Recreation center is maintained in Sunshine Park for players of shuffleboard, Croquet, Lawn bowling and Horse shoe pitching. Activities here are concentrated during the winter months when inter-city tournaments are held with surrounding resorts. Soft ball is played by leagues composed of both men and women. A modern field with excellent stands is used for outstanding games. Social activities are carried on by the Country Clubs, Fraternal orders and churches. There are also dances and card parties sponsored by various local organizations.

 EXHIBIT A

Exhibit A
 
 
Page 9.

EXHIBIT B

Exhibit B
Page 10.

EXHIBIT C

Applicable to the use of service for:

             FLORIDA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY

General Gas Service    

Character of Service:

Continuous – Low Pressure, Manufactured Gas.

Rate: (Per month)

Immediate

First 200 Cu. Ft. or less – $1.00

Next 2,000 Cu. Ft. 15.0¢ per CCF.

Next 7,000 Cu. Ft. 12.5¢ per CCF.

Next 10,000 Cu. Ft. 10.0¢ per CCF.

Over 20,000 Cu. Ft. 9.0¢ per CCF.

EXHIBIT D

Objective

First 500 Cu. Ft. or less – $1.00

Next 2000 Cu. Ft. 12¢ per CCF.

Next 7,500 Cu. Ft. 10¢ per CCF.

Next 10,000 Cu. Ft. 9¢ per CCF.

Over 20,000 Cu. Ft. 8¢ per CCF.

Minimum Charge: $1.00 per month per meter.

Page 11.

ORLANDO FROM THE AIR

This well designed city presents from the air a study in trees and lakes, with its curving avenues and lovely buildings which substantiate its well chosen name, “THE CITY BEAUTIFUL.”

Page 12.

Orlando Brief – Photo of Orlando From The Air

Caption: ORLANDO, FLORIDA – “THE CITY BEAUTIFUL” – FROM THE AIR

Page 13.

ORANGE AVENUE – ORLANDO

The main business street of Orlando is Orange Avenue, and the attached view shows the progressive modern type of business houses that line Orlando’s thoroughfares. Orlando is the shopping center for nearly three-fourths of the citrus producing section of Florida.

Page 14.

View Photo of Orange Avenue
Caption:
ORANGE AVENUE – Looking North from Church Street

Page 15.

HOTELS OF ORLANDO

Typical of the excellent hotel accommodations to be found in Orlando are views of several of our leading hotels. Also shown is a list of the representative hotels maintaining membership in the Greater Orlando Chamber of Commerce.

Page 15 – Orlando Brief includes photo of the San Juan Hotel in downtown Orlando.
Page 15 – Orlando Brief includes photo of the San Juan Hotel in downtown Orlando. Caption: San Juan Hotel
 
Page 16.
Page 16 – Orlando Brief. Caption: Angebilt Hotel 
Page 16 – Orlando Brief. Caption:Fort Gatlin Hotel

Page 17.

HOTELS OF ORLANDO
Maintaining Membership With
GREATER ORLANDO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

ANGEBILT, AVALON, CARLYN MANOR, COLONIAL ORANGE COURT, DUKE HALL, DWELLERE, EMPIRE, FORT GATLIN, JEFFERSON COURT, LAMAR, LLANYMOR, LUCERNE, ORANGE, OSCEOLA, SAN JUAN, SUMMERLIN, TREMONT, WYOMING

Page 18.

APARTMENT HOUSES IN ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Maintained by Orlando Apartment House Owners Society:

ALBERTSON APTS., ALEXANDER APTS., ALFRANK APTS., ATLANTIC APTS., ALLEN APTS., AMHERST APTS., AUTEN APTS., BROADWAY APTS., BUENA VISTA APTS., CORLISS APTS., COLVIN APTS., CHENEY COURT APTS., CROTIS APTS., DWELLERE APTS., DODENDORT APTS., ELVAN APTS., ESTIES APTS., GIFFORD ARMS APTS., GLADSTONE APTS., HOLYOKE APTS., HUTCHINS APTS., IVANHOE APTS., JONES APTS., KENHURST APTS., KLOCK APTS., LAKE O’THE WOODS APTS., LEXINGTON MANOR APTS., LINWOOD APTS., MADISON APTS., MANUEL COURT APTS., MANN APTS., MINNIE PAUL APTS., MINNEHAHA APTS., NEW GREENHURST APTS., NEW POINSETTIA APTS., NORMENT APTS., RICHMOND HALL APTS., RIDGEWOOD APTS., ROSALIND APTS., SAN REMO APTS., SCHWOB APTS., ST. REGIS APTS., SOUTHERN APTS., TRAVIS APTS., WILD ROSE APTS., WYNNHOLM APTS.

Page 19.

ORLANDO’S PUBLIC BUILDINGS

Pages 19 and 20 of Orlando Brief features three of Orlando’s Public Buildings in 1939. Caption: GREATER ORLANDO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

Pages 19 features a photo of the Orlando Chamber of Commerce building from 1939.

Page 20.

Page 20 of the Orlando Brief includes photos of the Albertson Public Library and the Orlando Municipal Auditorium
Page 20 – Orlando Brief . Caption:  Orlando Municipal Auditorium
Page 20 – Orlando Brief . Caption: Albertson Public Library

Page 21. TO BE ADDED.

Photo/Caption: ORLANDO UTILITIES COMMISSION (municipally owned)

Page 22.

BANKS OF ORLANDO

Page 22 Orlando Brief – Banks of Orlando. Two photos: First National Bank at Orlando and Florida Bank at Orlando (corner of Orange and
Page 22 Orlando Brief – Banks of Orlando. Caption: First National Bank
Page 22 Orlando Brief – Banks of Orlando. Caption: Florida Bank at Orlando. Building still stands at the NE corner of Orange and Central.

Page 23.

ORLANDO SCHOOLS
Page 23 – Orlando Brief – Orlando Schools. Two photos: Cherokee Junior High School and Concord Park Grammar School.

Page 23 – Orlando Brief – Orlando Schools. Caption: Cherokee Junior High School
Page 23 – Orlando Brief – Orlando Schools. Caption: Concord Park Grammar School
 
Page 24.
ORLANDO PARKS

Orlando Brief – Page 24 – Orlando Parks

Page 24, Photo at top of page: Caption: A glimpse of Orlando’s skyline across Lake Eola from the lily pond in Eola Park.

Orlando Brief – Page 24, Image Bottom of Page Caption: A fountain and rose garden in Eola Park.

Page 25.

Orlando Brief – Page 25 – Orlando Parks Continued

Page 25 – Edwards Park at Lake Ivanhoe. Caption: A rustic bridge and lake scene in Edwards Park on the shores of Lake Ivanhoe.
 
Page 26.
SPORTS IN ORLANDO

Orlando Brief – Page 26 – Sports in Orlando

Page 26, top photo. Caption: Cycling around one of Orlando’s lakes.
Page 26, bottom photo. Caption: A scene on one of the four sporty golf courses in and around Orlando.
 
Page 27.
Page 27, top photo. Caption: Tinker Field, where the Washington Nationals train each Spring and where the games of the Florida League are held in Orlando.
Page 27, bottom of page. Caption: One of the courts of the Orlando Tennis Club.
 
Included with the Orlando Brief above was a map of Orlando circa 1939 including historical information and listings of major businesses located in Orlando.

Businesses on reverse

Search “orlando maps” for additional maps of Orlando.

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ATTACHMENTS

Orlando Brief - Temperature Chart
Temperature chart from page 3 of Orlando Brief.
Orange Avenue Looking North
Orange Avenue Looking North
Orlando Brief - Exhibit A. Electric and Water Rates
Orlando Brief - Exhibit A. Electric and Water Rates Exhibit A
Orlando Brief - Exhibit B. Electric and Water Rates
Orlando Brief - Exhibit B. Electric and Water Rates Exhibit B
Orlando Brief - Orlando From The Air
Orlando Brief - Orlando From The Air
Sanlando Springs Tropical Park - postcard circa 1950
Color postcard of SanLando Springs a summer destination for many groups of young people during the 1930s-1960s. On May 18, 1955, All Souls Catho...
Orlando Brief Map
Mentioned on the page: Dubsdread County Club, Eola Park, Exposition Park, Sunshine Park, Orlando Lawn Bowling Club, Roque Club, Shuffleboard Club...
Orlando Brief Businesses
Businesses listed on the reverse of the map - part of Orlando Brief. Mentioned on the page: Dubsdread County Club, Eola Park, Exposition Park,...
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Orlando Brief - Orlando Tennis Club - Page 27

Page 27, bottom of page.
One of the courts of the Orlando Tennis Club.


Orlando Brief - Tinker Field - Page 27

Page 27, top photo.
Tinker Field, where the Washington Nationals train each Spring and where the games of the Florida League are held in Orlando.


Orlando Brief - Page 27

Page 27 of the Orlando Brief. Tinker Field and Tennis Courts.


Orlando Brief - Sports in Orlando - Page 26

Page 26 of the Orlando Brief. Sports in Orlando.
Cycling around one of Orlando's Lakes. A scene on one of the four sporty golf courses in and around Orlando.


Orlando Brief - Cycling in Orlando - Page 26

Page 26, top photo. Cycling around one of Orlando's lakes.


Orlando Brief - Golf Courses - Page 26

Page 26, bottom photo.
A scene on one of the four sporty golf courses in and around Orlando.


Orlando Brief - Orlando Parks Continued - Page 25

Page 25 - Edwards Park at Lake Ivanhoe.
Caption: A rustic bridge and lake scene in Edwards Park on the shores of Lake Ivanhoe. These parks are typical of those which surround each of the 33 lakes within the city limits.


Orlando Brief - Edwards Park - Page 25

Page 25 - Edwards Park at Lake Ivanhoe.
Caption: A rustic bridge and lake scene in Edwards Park on the shores of Lake Ivanhoe. These parks are typical of those which surround each of the 33 lakes within the city limits.


Orlando Brief - Page 24 - Orlando Parks

Orlando Brief - Page 24 - Orlando Parks


Orlando Brief - Page 24 - Lake Eola

Page 24, Photo at bottom of page: Caption: A glimpse of Orlando's skyline across Lake Eola from the lily pond in Eola Park.


Orlando Brief - Page 24 - Eola Park

Orlando Brief - Page 24, Image Bottom of Page
Caption: A fountain and rose garden in Eola Park.


Orlando Brief - Page 23 - Orlando Schools

Page 23 - Orlando Brief - Orlando Schools. Two photos: Cherokee Junior High School and Concord Park Grammar School.


Orlando Brief - Page 23 - Cherokee Junior High School

Page 23 - Orlando Brief - Orlando Schools. Cherokee Junior High School 


Orlando Brief - Page 23 - Concord Park Grammar School

Page 23 - Orlando Brief - Orlando Schools. Concord Park Grammar School


Orlando Brief - Page 22 - Banks of Orlando

Page 22 Orlando Brief - Banks of Orlando. Two photos: First National Bank (was located at Orange at Church?) at Orlando and Florida Bank at Orlando (corner of Orange and Central).


Orlando Brief - Page 22 - First National Bank at Orlando

Page 22 Orlando Brief - Banks of Orlando. First National Bank (was located at Orange at Church?) 


Orlando Brief - Page 22 - Florida Bank at Orlando

Page 22 Orlando Brief - Banks of Orlando. Florida Bank at Orlando. Building still stands at the NE corner of Orange and Central.


Orlando Brief - Page 19 - Orlando Chamber of Commerce
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Orlando Brief - Page 20 - Orlando's Public Buildings Continued

 Page 20 of the Orlando Brief includes photos of the Albertson Public Library and the Orlando Municipal Auditorium (Bob Carr Auditorium). The auditorium is hardly recognizable if you see it today as a facade was added to the front of the building that altered the entrance area many years ago.


Orlando Brief - Page 20 - Albertson Public Library

 Page 20 of the Orlando Brief includes photos of the Albertson Public Library and the Orlando Municipal Auditorium (Bob Carr Auditorium). The auditorium is hardly recognizable if you see it today as a facade was added to the front of the building that altered the entrance area many years ago.


Orlando Brief - Page 20 - Orlando Municipal Auditorium

 Page 20 of the Orlando Brief includes photos of the Albertson Public Library and the Orlando Municipal Auditorium (Bob Carr Auditorium). The auditorium is hardly recognizable if you see it today as a facade was added to the front of the building that altered the entrance area many years ago.


Orlando Brief - Page 19 - Orlando's Public Buildings

Pages 19 and 20 of Orlando Brief features three of Orlando's Public Buildings in 1939. The Orlando Chamber of Commerce Building is featured on Page 19. This building once stood on East Central where the Orlando Public Library now stands. One of the two overhangs over the entry doors of the building shown in the photo now resides on the third floor of the Orlando Public Library over the entrance to the used bookstore.


Orlando Brief - Photo Page 19 - Orlando Chamber of Commerce

Pages 19 and 20 of Orlando Brief features three of Orlando's Public Buildings in 1939. The Orlando Chamber of Commerce Building is featured on Page 19. This building once stood on East Central where the Orlando Public Library now stands. One of the two overhangs over the entry doors of the building shown in the photo now resides on the third floor of the Orlando Public Library over the entrance to the used bookstore.


Orlando Brief - Page 15 - Hotels in Orlando

Page 15 - Orlando Brief includes photo of the San Juan Hotel in downtown Orlando.


Orlando Brief - Photo Page 15 - San Juan Hotel

Page 15 - Orlando Brief includes photo of the San Juan Hotel in downtown Orlando.


Orlando Brief - Photo Top of Page 16 - Angebilt Hotel

Orlando Brief - Photo Top of Page 16 - Angebilt Hotel


Orlando Brief

Complete scanned "Orlando Brief" publication. 


WDBO Radio Broadcasting

Circa 1941, "About the Mystery of the Missing Dollar That Wasn't Missing" appears to be a humorous sales tool listing the facts and figures about the buying public in Orlando in an attempt to get companies to advertise on WDBO AM 580 radio station - Orlando Broadcasting Company.

The cover states it was "Published in the Sun Empire by WDBO - The Columbia station located at Orlando, Florida."

Includes letters to William G. McBride, Program Director for WDBO from McKesson & Robbins, Economy Wholesale Grocery Company, Winn Lovett Grocery Company, Tampa Drug Company. Also mentions Table Supply, Rileys, A&P Stores, Piggly Wiggly, Lovetts Grocerterias, All American Stores, Better Food Stores.


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